All posts tagged: migration

Leros, Greece: refugees’ daily life on the island, a reportage

Leros, a sleepy island in the Aegean, harbors one of Greece’s five refugee hotspots. The island is famous for its volcanic topography, rationalist architecture, and fascist Italian occupation – and it’s only miles from Turkey. The refugee camp sits on the ocean’s edge- an otherwise picturesque coastline that draws tourists from around Europe during sweeter summer months. The camp opened in March 2016 with the capacity to hold up to 980 residents. Today, the camp is dangerously overcrowded. There are nearly 3,200 refugees on the island, over 1,000 of which are homeless. To protect themselves from bitter temperatures and days of unrelenting rain, they’ve inhabited a sprawl of abandoned buildings surrounding the fenced camp. These dilapidated buildings once operated as a mental asylum, until the asylum was exposed for embezzlement and human rights abuses in 1989. The buildings are still littered with rusty bedframes and faded Greek medical documents. The roof is caving and the floor is covered in broken glass. There is no electricity – nor toilets, showers or garbage bins. The police regularly …

Global families and the role of migrant mothers

Italy, like many “advanced” countries, relies on migrant women’s labour to manage modern family lifestyles. The particular phenomenon, yet little studied in the italian immigration scene, is that women’s collaboration in family work, is implemented in ways that engage information technology and has an impact on the organization of the migrant’s original family, and society. In Global Families, Paola Bonizzoni, a researcher at the Department of Social and Political Studies, University of Milan, shows how the weight of the shortage of work, or couple’s problems are often faced with the departure of the woman. Often already a mother, migrant women work in situations that require them to help another’s family life. They experience distress situations due to forced separation from their own children and loved ones. In the transnational migration phenomenon studied by Paola Bonizzoni through the lens of global families, women still seek to maintain active roles in the management of the family of origin, implement complex forms of care; and, balancing suffering with embracing new challenges, still keep a grip on the texture of their …