All posts filed under: Globalization

The Greek asylum crisis: moving beyond the blame game to a real solution

– Anna Triandafyllidou, European University Institute An unusual wave of cold weather in the first week of January 2017 exposed the stark deficiencies of Greece’s asylum seeker policy. Camps housing tens of thousands people seeking refuge from war were hit by snow and freezing rain, with residents exposed to sub-zero temperatures and arctic winds. The winter crisis made headlines worldwide. It left no doubt of the fact that ten months after the EU-Turkey agreement led to a stark decrease in migrant flows to the country, Greece is still struggling to cope with the asylum challenge. Substantial funding has been made available to deal with the migration emergency, both directly to relevant ministries and to international NGOs. According to a recent European Commission report, Greece has received €295 million out of a total of €861 million earmarked for the Europe-wide refugee crisis. Of this €295 million, at least half has been given directly to international organisations. But it’s not working. Greece’s impossible task Greece is currently facing a Sisyphean task. It must first provide appropriate first reception …

Migrant Mothers

Italy, like many “advanced” countries, relies on migrant women’s labour to manage modern family lifestyles. The particular phenomenon, yet little studied in the italian immigration scene, is that women’s collaboration in family work, is implemented in ways that engage information technology and has an impact on the organization of the migrant’s original family, and society. In Global Families, Paola Bonizzoni, a researcher at the Department of Social and Political Studies, University of Milan, shows how the weight of the shortage of work, or couple’s problems are often faced with the departure of the woman. Often already a mother, migrant women work in situations that require them to help another’s family life. They experience distress situations due to forced separation from their own children and loved ones. In the transnational migration phenomenon studied by Paola Bonizzoni through the lens of global families, women still seek to maintain active roles in the management of the family of origin, implement complex forms of care; and, balancing suffering with embracing new challenges, still keep a grip on the texture of their …

Ethiopia,© Photo by Eric Lafforgue

Sacrificed Ethiopia

Ethiopia is building one of the most important African dams, on the Omo River. According to the government, the dam will double the amount of energy available in the country. “The dam will dramatically change the life of 200 000 people settled in the Omo Valley, says the French photographer-reporter Eric Lafforgue. The government plans to relocate people in new villages by promising access to health care and education. But traditional ethiopian tribes have always lived out of agriculture and cattle breeding. Today their lands have been confiscated and ‘rented’, for 1 euro a month, to multinational companies. Water from the dam is used to irrigate crops owned by corporations. The military take care of people who resist ‘modernization’. Some Suri people work for the multinationals. They earn 30 euro per month. They save to buy cows, but less and less land is available to graze. Situation is tense. The government sent armed troops to ‘control’ tribes. Then central Addis Ababa government organized a kind of dance competition, filmed and aired by  Ethiopian national TV, …